Shoulder seasons (& Friday links)

COMMENTS: 20

travel  Shoulder seasons (& Friday links) travel  Shoulder seasons (& Friday links)

Are you done with travel until the holidays or do you have any other getaways planned? I feel like now is both the time I most want to be a homebody and the best time to get out and hit the road. Shoulder season, when the days are still long (and in many places quite warm) but the crowds are thin is a great time to travel. Last year, we spent a beautiful weekend in Yosemite around this time.

Yosemite in the fall: Highly recommended.

Of course if you’re staying in, and getting reacquainted with Dr. Mindy Lahiri, Olivia Pope, the Bravermans and the like… I can get behind that, too. Here are a few links to supplement the return of fall television…

READ MORE

Eat Art
Immaculate Infatuati...
Etsy, anticipation, ...
Palm Springs and fir...
Sunday in Capay Vall...

Sant’Eustachio il Caffe, Rome: Best Espresso?

COMMENTS: 18

travel food drink  SantEustachio il Caffe, Rome: Best Espresso?

travel food drink  SantEustachio il Caffe, Rome: Best Espresso?

Whether or not it’s the best, the espresso at Sant’Eustachio Il Caffè is perhaps one of the most famous to be pulled in Rome. The classic experience involves standing at the bar, quickly sipping an espresso or caffé with a pastry. We opted for the fairly pricey table service, so that we could better enjoy the relative calm in the small piazza and better savor the rich, wonderful Nutella Aragosta (lobster-tail pastries) that Aron and I so fondly recalled from our last visit. The coffee is amazing, but these are honestly some of the best pastries we had on the trip (or ever). 

travel food drink  SantEustachio il Caffe, Rome: Best Espresso?

We’re just back from what was a wonderful three weeks in Italy. And though we’re still paying some of the price in jet lag, I’m already feeling nostalgic as I look at these photos. Alas, it’s probably best to put some distance between us and the permission we gave ourselves to schmear Nutella on anything bread-like.

I hope to share travelogues—I’m thinking it might make sense to break the trip into three parts—later in the month.

In the meantime, I couldn’t help but share these photos from one particularly pleasant morning in Rome:

travel food drink  SantEustachio il Caffe, Rome: Best Espresso?
travel food drink  SantEustachio il Caffe, Rome: Best Espresso?

Aron and I alternated sips of caffé latte and Gran caffé (slightly larger and frothier than an espresso); Hudson had a cup of chocolate, which was thick and slightly bitter and which Aron spooned for him as if he were a baby bird until the temperature was just right. Oh, the life of a (lucky) three year old.

The whole situation reminded me of this very decadent breakfast in Paris.

travel food drink  SantEustachio il Caffe, Rome: Best Espresso?

With most meals consisting of some combination of tomato sauce and Nutella or gelato, we realized we would be doing laundry every day unless we started having Hudson share Skyler’s bibs. (Eventually, he took to donning his “cape” and running very fast.)

travel food drink  SantEustachio il Caffe, Rome: Best Espresso?
travel food drink  SantEustachio il Caffe, Rome: Best Espresso?

Back when William Grimes of the New York Times found the espresso in New York to be lacking (many years ago), he famously wrote: “When the need for a real espresso becomes overpowering, buy a ticket to Rome, tell the taxi driver to head straight for the Sant’Eustachio cafe. The espresso will be perfect. A little expensive, but surely worth the trouble.” You could do worse than to follow that advice. Just be sure to try the Aragosta, too. 

Okay… back to bed.

P.S. Our pick for best croissants in New York.

Date night
Blue Bottle Coffee (...
Thinking about: autu...
Travelogue: Weekend ...
Planning for spontan...

5 Things: A Travel Guide to Charleston

COMMENTS: 8

travel  5 Things: A Travel Guide to Charleston

In “5 Things,” I’ll ask some of my favorite bloggers in cities all over the country to share insider travel tips on where to eat, shop, stay, and play in their neighborhoods (plus, what to pack to make the adventure complete). This week, Olivia Rae James shows us around charming Charleston, South Carolina.

5 Things: Charleston
Olivia Rae James

I first visited Charleston when I was in middle school, and immediately knew I would live here one day—it’s such an easy place to fall in love with. The peninsula on the South Carolina coast is small and walkable, but chock-full of amazing gems. To experience all the incredible food and drink here you’d have to stay weeks (or eat twelve meals a day), and there are constantly new alleys or secret gardens to be discovered. It’s a charming little city that’s perfect for getting lost in, but just in case you’re more of a planner, here are a few favorite must-see spots.

EAT:
travel  5 Things: A Travel Guide to Charleston travel  5 Things: A Travel Guide to Charleston
Chez Nous, 6 Payne Court, (843) 579-3060

Located in a tiny house tucked away in an alley, Chez Nous‘s small daily menu (two appetizers, two entrees, two desserts) never fails to amaze. Exquisite French food, intimate setting, charming people—I’m sold.

travel  5 Things: A Travel Guide to Charleston
travel  5 Things: A Travel Guide to Charleston

SHOP:
travel  5 Things: A Travel Guide to Charleston
travel  5 Things: A Travel Guide to Charleston
The Commons, 54 1/2 Broad Street, (646) 408-3447

The Commons is a little shop filled with the most amazing collection of American-made treasures. Hidden away on Broad Street, it shares a space with Heirloom Book Company, where you can find unique cookbooks, both new and old.

STAY:
travel  5 Things: A Travel Guide to Charleston
Zero George Street, 0 George Street, (843) 817-7900

Zero George Street is a bed-and-breakfast made up of five restored historic houses. With its contemporary decor, delicious breakfasts, gorgeous courtyard, and ideal location for walking anywhere in the historic district, it’s my favorite hotel downtown.

PLAY:
travel  5 Things: A Travel Guide to Charleston
travel  5 Things: A Travel Guide to Charleston
travel  5 Things: A Travel Guide to Charleston
My favorite thing to do in Charleston is to walk around the southernmost part of the peninsula, also known as South of Broad. It’s home to the most gorgeous houses, gardens, oak-shaded streets, narrow alleys, and endless water views. Battery Park is a perfect destination for running around with kids or dogs, and enjoying the stunning surroundings.

travel  5 Things: A Travel Guide to Charleston
If you feel like getting off the peninsula and heading to the coast, the drive to Sullivan’s Island is short and scenic (and the beach is beautiful).

PACK:
travel  5 Things: A Travel Guide to Charleston
travel  5 Things: A Travel Guide to Charleston
A sun hat, $98, and a light-and-easy dress, $80

Charleston gets very hot and very humid. Unless you’re visiting in the short winter season, prepare to bring cool clothes and sun protection. I love this straw hat from Accompany and this breezy white dress from Proud Mary.

Thank you so much, Olivia! And thank you to Shoko Wanger for her help with this series. I’ve only spent a couple of days in Charleston, for a wedding—but I just loved it! I hope to return soon and put these tips to use.

P.S. Olivia wrote a lovely guest post here while I was enjoying my first days home with baby Hudson. Seems like ages ago!

Milliken Creek (just...
Reacclimation
How I pack my diaper...
Travelogue: One mont...
Seminyak, Bali (and ...

5 Things: A Travel Guide to Brooklyn Heights

COMMENTS: 9

travel  5 Things: A Travel Guide to Brooklyn Heights
In “5 Things,” I’ll ask some of my favorite bloggers in cities all over the country to share insider travel tips on where to eat, shop, stay, and play in their neighborhoods (plus, what to pack to make the adventure complete). This week, Erin Boyle of Reading My Tea Leaves shows us the sights in beautiful Brooklyn Heights.

5 Things: Brooklyn Heights
Erin Boyle of Reading My Tea Leaves

My husband, James, and I have lived in Brooklyn Heights for just over three years and the quiet tree-lined streets that first attracted us to the neighborhood have equal appeal for visitors hoping to experience a respite from the crowds of Manhattan. In the summertime, the Brooklyn Heights Promenade fills with tourists hoping for a glimpse of the iconic downtown Manhattan skyline from across the river. We encourage visitors to pack a picnic blanket and lounge in nearby Brooklyn Bridge Park for a while. This may be New York, but that doesn’t mean you can’t take a little break from the hustle.

EAT:
travel  5 Things: A Travel Guide to Brooklyn Heights
travel  5 Things: A Travel Guide to Brooklyn Heights

The River Deli, 32 Joralemon Street, (718) 254-9200

The River Deli is one of our favorite spots in the neighborhood for a dinner out. It’s not fancy, or particularly trendy, but it’s affordable for young families, always yummy, and it’s tucked into a quiet corner that gives you a real taste of the neighborhood. Maybe best of all, it’s just a stone’s throw from one of the neighborhood’s greatest assets: Brooklyn Bridge Park. (Bonus: a window seat affords you some pretty nice neighborhood people watching).

If you’re planning a picnic, pick up supplies at Willowtown Store #7 on Columbia Place. And if you’re in the mood for something a little more refined, try dinner at Iris Café #9.

SHOP:
travel  5 Things: A Travel Guide to Brooklyn Heights
travel  5 Things: A Travel Guide to Brooklyn Heights

Holler & Squall, 119 Atlantic Avenue, (347) 223-4685

Holler & Squall on Atlantic Avenue is one of my favorite neighborhood shops to browse in on a lazy weekend. Filled with an eclectic mix of antiques, the shop always has a patinaed lamp or cozy Chesterfield sofa worth ogling (or splurging on). For something a little more family-friendly, BookCourt is just a few blocks away in nearby Cobble Hill and is a fantastic spot to pick up some vacation reading for adults and kiddos.

STAY:
travel  5 Things: A Travel Guide to Brooklyn Heights
travel  5 Things: A Travel Guide to Brooklyn Heights
travel  5 Things: A Travel Guide to Brooklyn Heights

AirBNB — Brooklyn Heights

Largely a residential neighborhood, I think visitors to Brooklyn Heights get the best sense of the neighborhood by finding an Airbnb rental in their budget that they can call home for a few nights. To consider: proximity to the Brooklyn Heights Promenade! (The French doors on this rental look dreamy.) For folks hoping for a more traditional hotel experience, the Marriott in downtown Brooklyn is also close by.

PLAY:
travel  5 Things: A Travel Guide to Brooklyn Heights
travel  5 Things: A Travel Guide to Brooklyn Heights

Brooklyn Bridge Park, 334 Furman Street, (718) 222-9939

Brooklyn Heights gives visitors a chance to experience the iconic Brooklyn Bridge, the Brooklyn Heights Promenade and its stunning views of lower Manhattan and New York Harbor, and the constantly expanding Brooklyn Bridge Park. James and I practically live in the park on the weekends, but it’s a place that’s as thrilling for out-of-towners as it is for neighborhood folks. For visitors, I’d recommend a morning walk over the Brooklyn Bridge (if you need to keep your reserves, just walk to the first tower and loop back around) and a lunchtime picnic at Pier 1. If you have kiddos, cool off at the splash pad at Pier 6 (and make things even easier on yourself by grabbing a pizza at the nearby Fornino outpost at Pier 6 or an ice cream from Ample Hills at Pier 5). If you’re visiting on a Sunday, the Brooklyn food fest extravaganza Smorgasburg at Pier 5 also provides plenty of lunch options. If you’re hankering for more of an adventure, catch a ride on the ferry to Governors Island (only $2.00) from Pier 6, and take a stroll around the leafy island before heading back to home base.

PACK:
travel  5 Things: A Travel Guide to Brooklyn Heights

A favorite picnic blanket, $99

One of the best parts about the neighborhood is its newly developed waterfront and the chance the park gives you to relax and soak in the energy of the city, from a distance. Pack a blanket and a few snacks and let the salty harbor air wash over you as you give your feet a rest. This buffalo check blanket from the Brooklyn-based Kaufmann Mercantile is a classic option for picnicking families.

Thank you so much, Erin! We loved Brooklyn Heights when we lived in New York (Holler & Squall as well!) but I wish we’d been around long enough to make use of these suggestions and to see the new waterfront park. I’m so looking forward to returning one day!

And thank you to Shoko Wanger for her help with this series! 

P.S. More of the “5 Things” series. And you may recall Erin from this post, too.

Making plans
Finished: Roatan Tra...
Finished: Croatia &a...
In and Out, Out and ...
Planning for spontan...

We’re still here.

COMMENTS: 4

travel  Were still here.

travel  Were still here.

travel  Were still here.

We’re eking out the last drops of summer in Italy, doing our best to ignore the changing light that heralds fall. It’s been quite warm here in Tuscany, and so it has been easy… until yesterday, that is—when storms came through and I bought a scarf to keep off the chill. Fortunately, it’s beautiful here no matter what the forecast.

I’m taking far too many photos (editing is going to be a tough chore when we come home) and eating just enough gelato (at least one a day, sometimes more). I’ve been posting some photos on Instagram while it’s been quiet on the blog, if you follow along there, but I’m looking forward to resuming the two new series this week: first, 5 Things, with a second travel guide to Brooklyn (this time, Brooklyn Heights); and second, The Work We Do, with a lovely friend and entrepreneur.

I hope you will check back! Ciao!

travel  Were still here.

P.S. The first two 5 Things: Travel Guides to Williamsburg and San Luis Obispo. And The Work We Do with The Wonder Jam.

[Photos taken just outside of Monticchiello di Pienza‎, at our Agriturismo]

Quack, Quack
Travelogue: Italy
Visiting Disneyland ...
Seminyak, Bali (and ...
Bring a children's b...

Arrivederci!

COMMENTS: 13

travel  Arrivederci!
travel  Arrivederci!
travel  Arrivederci!

Buon giorno! A few travel hiccups, but we just arrived in Italy!

These aren’t our photos, but rather some graciously sent to me by readers by way of my crowd-sourcing experiment. (I didn’t forget!)

Above: Spaghetti Cacio e Pepe from Gourmet Traveler // “Lago di Como, Varenna, number 3″ from Edward Brydon, and the beach at Tropea from Michelle Summerville at 3ontheGo.

READ MORE

Enjoy the Weekend!
Hello, Bali!
Looking back: Corsic...
Oakland stowaways (a...
La Maison Angelina a...

Looking back at Cape Cod (& Friday links)

COMMENTS: 16

travel  Looking back at Cape Cod (& Friday links)
travel  Looking back at Cape Cod (& Friday links) travel  Looking back at Cape Cod (& Friday links) travel  Looking back at Cape Cod (& Friday links)
travel  Looking back at Cape Cod (& Friday links) travel  Looking back at Cape Cod (& Friday links) travel  Looking back at Cape Cod (& Friday links)

The stores are forecasting fall a bit too early for my taste. I’m not yet done with summer. How are you spending these last weeks of the season? I felt inspired to look back at our time spent in Cape Cod and cringed at the tiny photos in those travelogues. So this past week, I went through and updated the images. I hope you’ll have a look: Our first travelogue from Cape Cod, and one from a pre-baby getaway the summer Hudson was born.

And here are a few other things you might take a look at…
READ MORE

Some scenes from the...
New Travelogue, Sout...
Eat Art
Returning to La Casa...
The best gifts for a...

Thinking about: Step Away from the SmartPhone

COMMENTS: 22

travel  Thinking about: Step Away from the SmartPhone

How many times a day do you refresh your email? Or check your Instagram or Facebook feeds? There’s a certain amount of social media I feel like is required by the nature of my work, but I’m certainly guilty of just bouncing around from app to app refreshing in moments of boredom or, worse even, out of habit.

I realized the other day that I was opening Feedly again after having just closed it moments earlier… out of habit!

Or was it out of a fundamental, human need for distraction?

There was a fascinating study discussed on NPR a week or so back on how we can’t even stop the distractions to think! The abstract of the study, which was published in Science, reads:

“In 11 studies, we found that participants typically did not enjoy spending 6 to 15 minutes in a room by themselves with nothing to do but think, that they enjoyed doing mundane external activities much more, and that many preferred to administer electric shocks to themselves instead of being left alone with their thoughts. Most people seem to prefer to be doing something rather than nothing, even if that something is negative.”

Yes, you read that correctly: they offered participants the option to do nothing or to push a button that delivered a slightly painful, electric shock (and that they were told would do so).

Here’s my follow-up question: Would the results have been different if the population tested weren’t already living with constant stimulation? It’s said that our generation is particularly guilty of being incapable of being alone with our thoughts and we blame it on things like fast-paced television, smartphones and the like.

In other words, would a population not used to hitting refresh all the time, a population without smartphones, also choose to hit “go” on the 9-volt battery? Is this a generational problem, or a human one? Interestingly, 66% of the men chose to shock themselves, while only 25% of the women did.

Do you think you could do it? How long would enjoy being without distraction?

Likewise, do you remember when you’d go on vacation and only check your email once a week (if at all!) at a dedicated WiFi cafe? It was so painful to spend an hour in one of those hot, sweaty little rooms with some great vista just outside. Now we just bring our iPhones along. And again, I’d hate to be without the camera. I’d miss the functionality of searching recommendations on Pinterest or Twitter, the fun of sharing snapshots on Instagram, the ease of reading the newspaper or a book on my phone on the plane rather than toting something bulkier along. But I sort of hate how tethered I am with it.

How do you deal with this? How do you combat what I imagine many of us face: a love/hate relationship with our smartphones?

P.S. More things I’ve been thinking about.

[Photo on my phone is mine, from our trip to Sardinia]

Backseat driving
Surfboards and Clam ...
Markets of Ubud
Summertime gadget: W...
Looking back at Cape...

5 Things: A Travel Guide to San Luis Obispo

COMMENTS: 15

travel california  5 Things: A Travel Guide to San Luis Obispo

In “5 Things,” I’ll ask some of my favorite bloggers in cities all over the country to share insider travel tips on where to eat, shop, stay, and play in their neighborhoods (plus, what to pack to make the adventure complete). This week, Jennifer Young introduces us to the town of San Luis Obispo.

5 Things: San Luis Obispo
Jennifer Young of I Art U and Jennifer Young Studio.

Welcome to the happiest city in America (or so Oprah says!). San Luis Obispo, aka SLO, is a charming coastal town located right between Los Angeles and San Francisco. I’ve been lucky enough to call this place home for the past five years. It’s the perfect place to visit for a weekend getaway, whether you’re in need of a trip to the great outdoors or just want a beautiful pit stop when traveling between LA and SF. There’s so much to do in the area, but here are some of my top picks.

EAT:
travel california  5 Things: A Travel Guide to San Luis Obispo

travel california  5 Things: A Travel Guide to San Luis Obispo

Novo, 726 Higeura Street, (805) 543-3986

Novo is a local and tourist favorite in the heart of downtown SLO. Their outdoor patio dining in the evening is an SLO experience not to be missed. They serve a global cuisine with a plethora of wine choices (and great cocktails, too!).

SHOP:
travel california  5 Things: A Travel Guide to San Luis Obispo
travel california  5 Things: A Travel Guide to San Luis Obispo

Ruby Rose, 1235 Monterey Street, (805) 545-7964

Ruby Rose is the best place to shop, hands down. I don’t consider SLO to be a place for great shopping, but Ruby Rose will sweep you off your feet. From the gals at Ruby Rose themselves: “Combined with our love of junking, paired with the spirit of the road trip, we travel around the West Coast in our Airstream trailer. We scour flea markets, thrift stores, estate & yard sales to bring back lovelies to our vintage shop located in the quaint town of San Luis Obispo, California.”

Ruby Rose is open from Tuesday to Saturday, 11 AM — 5 PM, and Sunday 12 PM — 4 PM. Make time in your schedule to visit this gem of a place!

travel california  5 Things: A Travel Guide to San Luis Obispo
travel california  5 Things: A Travel Guide to San Luis Obispo
travel california  5 Things: A Travel Guide to San Luis Obispo

STAY:
travel california  5 Things: A Travel Guide to San Luis Obispo
travel california  5 Things: A Travel Guide to San Luis Obispo

Granada Hotel and Bistro, 1126 Morro Street, (805) 544-9100

Another gem in the heart of downtown, Granada Hotel and Bistro is an ideal place to stay if you want to be in the center of everything — but with only 17 guest rooms and suites, make sure to book early. They have everything you will need for your stay in downtown SLO — access to complimentary Linus bikes; an indoor lounge with a fireplace; a rooftop patio for drinks and people watching; a downstairs bistro that serves brunch, lunch, dinner, and dessert; and a spa. What more could you need? (Oh, and a major bonus if you’re staying there on a Thursday evening — you’ll be steps away from SLO’s weekly farmers’ market. It’s the best!)

PLAY:
travel california  5 Things: A Travel Guide to San Luis Obispo
travel california  5 Things: A Travel Guide to San Luis Obispo

When I think of San Luis Obispo, the first thing that comes to mind is the abundance of beaches and hiking/running trails available. It’s a really great city to be in if you want to unplug and spend some time to soak in the beauty of the outdoors. I have so many favorite trails and beaches, but hiking Bishop’s Peak is high on the list. Make it to the top and you’ll get the best view of this charming city!

PACK:

travel california  5 Things: A Travel Guide to San Luis Obispo

A great weekender bag like this one from Cuyana* would suffice for a trip here to SLO. Oh and don’t forget to pack your sunnies and sunblock if you plan to spend a lot of time outside! Enjoy!

Thanks so much, Jennifer! For more, find Jen’s blog, I Art U, and her Instagram feed, here.

P.S. One of our favorite California coastal drives, that will take you right around San Luis Obispo (where, by the way, so many of my friends were lucky to go to college)! And last week’s “5 Things.” 

(Thank you to Shoko Wanger for her help with this series. *Note that the bag is sold out. Here’s a similar one.)

On the road
And we're off...
Prêt à Voyager
Skycouch
Flying with a baby o...

5 Things: A Travel Guide to Williamsburg

COMMENTS: 13

travel  5 Things: A Travel Guide to Williamsburg
travel  5 Things: A Travel Guide to Williamsburg
I’m so excited to bring you this new travel series! I’ve found that when asking people advice about visiting their city, it’s best to ask them where they’d take a friend.

So, in “5 Things,” I’ll ask some of my favorite bloggers in cities all over the country to share insider travel tips on where to eat, shop, stay, and play in their neighborhoods (plus, what to pack to make the adventure complete)—the things they’d do. In the series’ inaugural post, Shoko Wanger of Sho & Tell introduces us to Williamsburg in Brooklyn, NY. 

5 Things: Williamsburg
Shoko Wanger of Sho & Tell

I’ve lived in Williamsburg for four years now and have become gleefully accustomed to the steady influx of visitors that stream through in the spring and summer months. Fortunately, there’s no shortage of things to do in the area—we’ve got some of the best restaurants and shopping in the city (though I admit, as an adoring resident, I’m biased). It would be impossible to fit everything I love about Williamsburg into a weekend—but, happily, that’s just another reason to return.

EAT:
travel  5 Things: A Travel Guide to Williamsburg
travel  5 Things: A Travel Guide to Williamsburg

travel  5 Things: A Travel Guide to Williamsburg

Bakeri, 150 Wythe Avenue, (718) 388-8037

The backyard at Bakeri is a true gem—a tiny, tucked-away oasis just minutes from the bustle of Bedford Avenue. It’s a great stop for coffee or tea, sandwiches on housemade breads, or assorted pastries (my favorite is skolebrød, a custardy Norwegian treat showered in grated coconut). Everything’s exceptional—and served up by a smiling staff in powder-blue jumpsuits, no less.

SHOP:
travel  5 Things: A Travel Guide to Williamsburg
travel  5 Things: A Travel Guide to Williamsburg
travel  5 Things: A Travel Guide to Williamsburg

Beautiful Dreamers, 326 Wythe Avenue, (718) 388-4884

Located on an unassuming block on the south side of Williamsburg, Beautiful Dreamers is a bohemian wonderland packed with ethereal treasures: clothing and clay incense burners, handmade pottery and patchwork quilts, plants in every nook and cranny. There’s a wooden swing near the front window; behind the cashier, white doves rest, cooing quietly in a sea-green cage.

STAY:
travel  5 Things: A Travel Guide to Williamsburg

Wythe Hotel, 80 Wythe Avenue, (718) 460-8000

The rooftop view at the Wythe Hotel is reason enough to book a stay. Further incentives: it’s beautifully built and a paragon of Brooklyn design (it’s co-owned by the same team behind neighborhood mainstays Marlow & Sons, Marlow & Daughters,and Diner). Its rooms feature pine ceilings, furnishings made by local artisans, and custom Williamsburg-themed wallpaper. It’s also home to an acclaimed restaurant, Reynard, and a gorgeous bar, The Ides, where said rooftop views are best enjoyed.

PLAY:
travel  5 Things: A Travel Guide to Williamsburg

travel  5 Things: A Travel Guide to Williamsburg

travel  5 Things: A Travel Guide to Williamsburg

Williamsburg waterfront and East River State Park, Kent Avenue at N. 8th Street

I love the Williamsburg waterfront, with the bridge to the left and the Manhattan skyline straight ahead. Have a picnic in the grass, take a walk on the pier, or hitch a ride to Greenpoint or DUMBO on the East River Ferry. During warm weather months, Smorgasburg—a food-focused flea market with over 75 vendors—makes its home here every Saturday, in East River State Park.

PACK:
travel  5 Things: A Travel Guide to Williamsburg

Backpack, $42.

I learned quickly that a big bag is key to mastering a day out in New York. Without a car to stow things in, I often find myself carrying ridiculous amounts of stuff around with me every day: makeup, an umbrella, an iPhone charger, a camera, and all the various odds and ends I pick up over the course of a day. A roomy bag makes it easier—and more comfortable—to be out and about with everything a multi-hour excursion requires. I like these backpacks from Baggu, which, as it happens, is a Williamsburg-based company. (You can visit their shop at 242 Wythe Avenue.)

Thank you so much, Shoko—for this and for your tremendous help with the entire series!
P.S. More Williamsburg: Our favorite restaurant (ever), Renegade on the waterfront, and Brooklyn Brewery.

Photos by Jacquelyne Pierson.

Warm in the sun
Travelogue: Sardinia...
Magnificent Specimen...
Growler
Weekend in Los Angel...

Road Trip: Wenatchee, WA, to Portland, OR

COMMENTS: 17

travel  Road Trip: Wenatchee, WA, to Portland, OR

travel  Road Trip: Wenatchee, WA, to Portland, OR

Last week I shared our first stop on our quick road trip around the Cascades—Seattle.

For the last two nights of our #GreatCoastRoadTrip with Coast Hotels, we drove first to Wenatchee, Washington, and then onto Portland, Oregon, before flying home. It was a whirlwind—and of course I’d suggest that anyone considering doing the same to extend this over many more days!

We left Seattle early on a quiet Monday morning, stopping only for some fuel at Top Pot Doughnuts before beginning our drive through the Cascade mountains to the Apple capitol of the World, Wenatchee.

We were quite wary about even the 2-1/2 hour drive because car rides with a four-month-old are pretty unpredictable and we’d already had plenty of scream-filled rides around Seattle. Ten minutes can feel unendurably long when your baby is crying, so we basically resigned ourselves to the fact that we could really only make ground when Skyler was sleeping.

Our saving grace is that four-month-olds like to sleep. A lot. So with only one roadside stop to nurse in the mountains (with a beautiful view!), we pulled up to the Coast Wenatchee Center Hotel around noon—just in time for lunch.travel  Road Trip: Wenatchee, WA, to Portland, OR

travel  Road Trip: Wenatchee, WA, to Portland, OR

I’ll confess that we were at first a little disappointed to leave the mountains and drive into the foothills. The landscape changed from that wet, green lushness that one associates with the Pacific Northwest to one of golden grasses—much more like what one finds in our own region—and even in the Southwest, at times!

WENATCHEE, WA

But the small town won us over and we immediately came to understand what an awesome getaway this must be for folks needing a break from wetter climes: apparently the sun shines in Wenatchee an average of 300 days a year (as opposed to 152 in nearby Seattle). Its prime draws, beyond sunshine, are apple orchards, vineyards, and plenty of outdoor activities—like hiking, mountain biking, kayaking, or paddle boarding. Their chamber of commerce has put together a pretty inspiring website, if you’re looking for ideas.

travel  Road Trip: Wenatchee, WA, to Portland, OR

travel  Road Trip: Wenatchee, WA, to Portland, OR

After a warm welcome from the hotel (with little gifts for the kids), we walked a few blocks over to the very colorful Lemolo Cafe, where a sprawling, seasonal menu meant that Aron and I could still try things like Salmon pizza while Hudson could order a PB&J. Everyone wins.

travel  Road Trip: Wenatchee, WA, to Portland, OR

travel  Road Trip: Wenatchee, WA, to Portland, OR

travel  Road Trip: Wenatchee, WA, to Portland, OR

The Wenatchee Valley Museum and Cultural Center is closed Sundays and Mondays, but they were nice enough to open their doors and give us a private tour. Housed in two joined historic buildings (former postal facilities), the museum hosts both permanent and rotating exhibits. A docent played for us—and let Hudson play—a 1919-built pipe organ, once used to add sound to silent films at the Liberty Theatre. Other highlights included a working model of the Great Northern Railway and an entire apple-sorting line from the 1920s.

travel  Road Trip: Wenatchee, WA, to Portland, OR

travel  Road Trip: Wenatchee, WA, to Portland, OR

We sort of rushed through (naptimes were fast approaching!) but learning more about the region’s apple-industry history was the perfect transition to a brief stop at an apple orchard: Smallwood’s Harvest Farm.

travel  Road Trip: Wenatchee, WA, to Portland, OR

There are dozens of farms and fruit stands in the area, but this one also had a small petting zoo and some play options that Hudson really appreciated. However, if you are coming expressly to pick apples during Harvest season, I might look around for some options further off the main road.

travel  Road Trip: Wenatchee, WA, to Portland, OR
travel  Road Trip: Wenatchee, WA, to Portland, OR

travel  Road Trip: Wenatchee, WA, to Portland, OR

travel  Road Trip: Wenatchee, WA, to Portland, OR

Next we took a quick walk around the Bavarian village of Leavenworth—probably the more famous tourist town in the area, and a popular spot around the holidays.

travel  Road Trip: Wenatchee, WA, to Portland, OR
travel  Road Trip: Wenatchee, WA, to Portland, OR

travel  Road Trip: Wenatchee, WA, to Portland, OR

That evening, we left the car back at the hotel and walked down to the waterfront for dinner at the Pybus market. The beautiful space hosts restaurants, wine bars, cheese shops, and fruit stands—though Hudson went right for the small lego table that was set out for kids.

travel  Road Trip: Wenatchee, WA, to Portland, OR

travel  Road Trip: Wenatchee, WA, to Portland, OR
travel  Road Trip: Wenatchee, WA, to Portland, OR

travel  Road Trip: Wenatchee, WA, to Portland, OR

Most of the vendors had closed for the night, but luckily the restaurants stayed open late. We chose to eat at the Latin restaurant, South—sitting outside on the patio with views of the Columbia River. (Aron was tasked with trying to bounce Skyler to sleep during dinner, so I should amend that to say that Hudson and I sat and enjoyed the views).
travel  Road Trip: Wenatchee, WA, to Portland, OR

travel  Road Trip: Wenatchee, WA, to Portland, OR

travel  Road Trip: Wenatchee, WA, to Portland, OR

travel  Road Trip: Wenatchee, WA, to Portland, OR

After taking in the views of the valley from atop the hotel at the Rivertop Bar & Grill, looking down at the river we’d be following all the way into Portland… for five hours or so.

This was the drive that really struck terror in our hearts, but it went as well as we could possibly have hoped for. Skyler may not like being in her car seat very much, but she is learning to fall asleep in it! I had to squeeze in between her and Hudson only once to entertain her.
travel  Road Trip: Wenatchee, WA, to Portland, OR

travel  Road Trip: Wenatchee, WA, to Portland, OR

travel  Road Trip: Wenatchee, WA, to Portland, OR

At one point, after going through a stretch of roughly 40 miles with no options for stops, we passed a sign for St. John’s, a Greek Orthodox Monastery that was fronted by a cafe with espresso and baklava and such. We were maybe a minute past when she woke and starting crying so we quickly make a U-turn and stayed there for about an hour or so for lunch.

It was the best find! Fresh savory and sweet pastries, gyros, good coffee, some picnic tables, and little patch of grass and tree stumps for Hudson to run around in! Highly recommended if you’re coming this way.

PORTLAND, OR

This was both of our first times to Portland, so we wished we could have arrived earlier and stayed longer.

Though formally known as the City of Roses, most people are probably more familiar with Portland’s informal catchphrase, “Keep Portland Weird.” For me, the city connotes bikes, bridges, and brews. Roses, eccentrics, or beer? Whichever held true, I was excited to finally have the chance to visit.

travel  Road Trip: Wenatchee, WA, to Portland, OR

We pulled into downtown and up to The Benson, a stately 101-year-old hotel on Broadway, and were welcomed inside a grand lobby where gorgeous Russian-wood panelling, beautiful marble floors, elaborate chandeliers, and incredible filigree had us all craning our necks to take in every lovely detail. The idea behind the Coast Hotels brand is that each hotel is “refreshingly local,” and the Benson in particular felt completely unique to the city.

Our room was a corner suite: a double room joined with a junior suite that meant we could put the kids to bed in their own space–such a luxury.

travel  Road Trip: Wenatchee, WA, to Portland, OR
travel  Road Trip: Wenatchee, WA, to Portland, OR

But perhaps what stood out the most was a particularly child-friendly touch: they sent up a fish for Hudson to take care of during our stay!

We named the little blue Beta Phil and Hudson talked to him and showed him his toys. In fact, when we came home to Davis, Hudson said he wanted to go back to the hotel to see “Phil-ly Fish.” A two-year-old more excited about returning to a hotel than about his own dog and his own toys?! That’s golden.

travel  Road Trip: Wenatchee, WA, to Portland, OR
travel  Road Trip: Wenatchee, WA, to Portland, OR

We tried to get started with our look around Portland as soon as we dropped our bags, but after five-plus hours in the car and a hungry infant I’ll admit there was a part of me that just wanted to enjoy the beautiful room!

We rallied, however, and I’m glad we did. We started at the beautiful (and expansive–over 5,000 acres) Forest Park. There, we discovered Peggy the steam engine, a Discovery Center with a Dr. Seuss exhibit, the Rose Test Garden, the Portland Zoo, and a fantastic looking children’s museum. The park itself sounds like an amazing urban treasure, with nearly 70 miles of trails crossing its entirety.

travel  Road Trip: Wenatchee, WA, to Portland, OR
travel  Road Trip: Wenatchee, WA, to Portland, OR

Still, we wanted to give Hudson a little more of a chance to burn off some steam, so next we headed to PlayDate PDX for an hour of jumping and climbing (for him) and a couple of cold beers (for us).

travel  Road Trip: Wenatchee, WA, to Portland, OR

Basically, they’ve put a three-story playground inside a loft with a cafe. It’s a brilliant concept–particularly for when the days aren’t as lovely as this one.

travel  Road Trip: Wenatchee, WA, to Portland, OR
travel  Road Trip: Wenatchee, WA, to Portland, OR

But because the sun was shining (and would be, until nearly 10pm), we coaxed him off to dinner at nearby Boke Bowl. They feature ramen with handmade noodles, unique dashis, and seasonally changing ingredients.

The restaurant was suggested to us by our friends, who we met up with for dinner. At their suggestion, I added fried chicken to mine and Aron topped his dish with pork belly and an egg. We rounded things out with steam buns (Hudson’s had peanut butter and jelly inside), and a brussel sprout salad. It was only the next day that I realized we’d forgotten to try the housemade miso-butterscotch twinkies!

Of course, there were countless awesome restaurants (and at least a dozen brewpubs) recommended to us by the many friends who have raved about the food scene in Portland. If only there were more meals in the day…

travel  Road Trip: Wenatchee, WA, to Portland, OR
travel  Road Trip: Wenatchee, WA, to Portland, OR

The next morning, the Benson treated us to a hearty breakfast at their restaurant, the Palm Court. Most of the diners looked a bit more like business travelers, so our table looked especially full by comparison: Blueberry Pancakes (packed with blueberries, the way I like them), Eggs with smokey hollandaise, Almond smoothies, fresh coffee, and hot oatmeal.

Funny side note: our waitress brought Hudson some crayons and he was showing her a stuffed bear the hotel had given him. She asked if he were afraid of bears and he answered “no.” She looked a little surprised and glanced over at us, sort of as if we hadn’t been doing our duty explaining the danger. It was one of the moments when you realize that if you live in the Pacific Northwest, you’d probably talk about bears a bit more often than just reading about that family of Berensteins.

travel  Road Trip: Wenatchee, WA, to Portland, OR

travel  Road Trip: Wenatchee, WA, to Portland, OR
travel  Road Trip: Wenatchee, WA, to Portland, OR

travel  Road Trip: Wenatchee, WA, to Portland, OR

All that food should have meant not eating again for many hours, but alas there was just too much good stuff to find room for. Before 1pm we’d also sampled a scoop of Brown Sugar Sour Cream and Strawberry Jam ice cream from Ruby Jewel, Transylvanian fare from the 10th and Alder food truck pod, lattes from Stumptown coffee, a pork belly and cheddar sandwich from Lardo, and one or two local IPAs. I even tried to score a doughnut at Blue Star (whose sign would fit right in to an episode of Portlandia), but they were sold out!

travel  Road Trip: Wenatchee, WA, to Portland, OR

travel  Road Trip: Wenatchee, WA, to Portland, OR

Somehow, in between all this gluttony, we also made some time for shopping and strolling between downtown and the Pearl District. One of the highlights was finally visiting the bookstore I’ve been hearing about for years: Powell’s City of Books. A Portland institution–and rightly so–Powell’s is the largest used-and-new bookstore in the world with nine color-coded rooms and over 3,500 different sections. I was especially partial to the light-filled children’s section.

travel  Road Trip: Wenatchee, WA, to Portland, OR

travel  Road Trip: Wenatchee, WA, to Portland, OR

travel  Road Trip: Wenatchee, WA, to Portland, OR
travel  Road Trip: Wenatchee, WA, to Portland, OR

Other highlights? Union Alley, which housed a Steven Alan and the local brand, Danner; Canoe, a meticulously curated home design store; and Frances May, an indie boutique filled with covetable labels.

travel  Road Trip: Wenatchee, WA, to Portland, OR
travel  Road Trip: Wenatchee, WA, to Portland, OR
travel  Road Trip: Wenatchee, WA, to Portland, OR
travel  Road Trip: Wenatchee, WA, to Portland, OR

And of course, coffee at Stumptown and photobooth snapshots at the ACE Hotel. (Shhhh… don’t tell the Benson.)

travel  Road Trip: Wenatchee, WA, to Portland, OR
travel  Road Trip: Wenatchee, WA, to Portland, OR
travel  Road Trip: Wenatchee, WA, to Portland, OR

It was probably best for my wallet that we had to leave for the airport after lunch. But we definitely had to go too soon. Portland, we’ll be back.

P.S. Coast Hotels invited me to blog our trip (which they entirely provided) for their website. I’m under no further obligation to write about them here, but we’re grateful to them for this taste of the Pacific Northwest. Read the Seattle travelogue from our road trip.

Shut-eye on a red-ey...
Travelogue: Montauk ...
We're Back!
St. Lucia (the iPhon...
How to make Michelad...

Weekend in Los Angeles (West Side)

COMMENTS: 25

travel california  Weekend in Los Angeles (West Side)
travel california  Weekend in Los Angeles (West Side)
travel california  Weekend in Los Angeles (West Side)
travel california  Weekend in Los Angeles (West Side)

After we landed in Los Angeles last Saturday, we went straight to Abbot Kinney Boulevard in Venice. There were a few cool shops and restaurants there when we lived in LA, but it was nothing like it is now—Steven Alan, A+R, Jack Spade, Firefly, Linus… and a few dozen delicious places to eat and drink line the blocks.

We started with brunch upstairs at The Tasting Kitchen.

READ MORE

Our family get-toget...
Cape Cod or bust
Crowd-sourcing: trav...
Toddler Snacks On th...
Thinking about: autu...

MiniVacay (& Dinner at Blue Plate Oysterette)

COMMENTS: 14

travel family  MiniVacay (& Dinner at Blue Plate Oysterette)
travel family  MiniVacay (& Dinner at Blue Plate Oysterette)

We skipped town this past weekend and headed south to Los Angeles. (Thank you for your tips!) We had some business to attend to and decided at the last minute to extend our travel and bring everyone—except Sawyer, who had a mini-vacation of his own thanks to DogVacay. (More on that below.)

Even though we used to live in Los Angeles, we hardly know the west side at all, so we decided to restrict ourselves to the coast (with, okay, a small detour into Brentwood).

I took a bunch of photos and will share more about some of the highlights next week, but—in the meantime—one of our favorite stops from the weekend: Blue Plate Oysterette in Santa Monica.

travel family  MiniVacay (& Dinner at Blue Plate Oysterette)
travel family  MiniVacay (& Dinner at Blue Plate Oysterette)

We walked from our hotel to Blue Plate Oysterette—which sits right on Ocean Boulevard off Santa Monica overlooking the, well, overlook to the beach. It’s a popular spot (as are the other locations in the restaurant group: nearby Blue Plate and Blue Plate Taco), so because we didn’t have reservations, we just crossed our fingers and showed up early. The wait wasn’t too bad (about 45 minutes to sit outside), so they took our number and we walked down to the sand and played a bit before dinner. But even without that option, I loved that they had sidewalk chalk at the ready for antsy kids.

travel family  MiniVacay (& Dinner at Blue Plate Oysterette)
travel family  MiniVacay (& Dinner at Blue Plate Oysterette)
travel family  MiniVacay (& Dinner at Blue Plate Oysterette)

When we did sit down, I knew exactly what I wanted: a Lobster roll! While the scene was very Los Angeles, the menu was very East Coast, and I was offered a choice of a Lobster Salad roll or a plain, warm Lobster roll with drawn butter on the side. There are two camps on this, but I’m more a lobster salad gal—and this was a good one.

travel family  MiniVacay (& Dinner at Blue Plate Oysterette)
travel family  MiniVacay (& Dinner at Blue Plate Oysterette)
travel family  MiniVacay (& Dinner at Blue Plate Oysterette)
travel family  MiniVacay (& Dinner at Blue Plate Oysterette)

A sleeping baby, plenty of french fries, lobster and fresh tuni, beer and rosé, and a setting sun… could dinner be better?

Um, yes. Yes it could: Key Lime Pie. (And, frankly, the best non-homemade Key Lime Pie I’ve had since visiting the keys nearly 12 years ago. So good.)

travel family  MiniVacay (& Dinner at Blue Plate Oysterette)
travel family  MiniVacay (& Dinner at Blue Plate Oysterette)

Actually, there was more that made it great: while we were out, Hudson told the waiter all about his “black doggy named Sawyer.” We always tell Hudson that Sawyer is having a playdate while we’re away—and this time we were able to give details with full sincerity because we were getting little updates on how Sawyer was enjoying his weekend!

Before our trip, DogVacay got in touch about trying their site and the timing was perfect! DogVacay is a website and app that helps you find great pet sitters. We searched for nearby sitters, booked our stay, and paid online. Sawyer’s host took care of him in her home, sent us cute little emails and photos of what he was up to while we were gone.

travel family  MiniVacay (& Dinner at Blue Plate Oysterette)

We learned that he spent the weekend with lovely Mia (in the photos on the left) and a pug named Auggie, as well as Charlie the kitten (on the right). He also got a bath!

A funny combination of topics, I know, but knowing that Sawyer was happy made the entire weekend better. If you’re looking to take a night or two away and need a good pet sitter, I’d recommend the site. New users can get $10 off their first DogVacay with the code HITHER!

P.S. Sawyer as a puppy! More from Los Angeles (and from our earlier Pacific Northwest road trip)  next week!

Thank you to DogVacay for putting Sawyer up for the night and for supporting Hither & Thither! All DogVacay reservations include free pet insurance, 24/7 customer support, and daily photo “pup”dates, so pet parents can rest easy knowing that their best friend is in great hands. We’ll definitely be using the site again!

Hither & Thither...
Visiting Disneyland ...
Life's Measuring Sti...
Perfect Scrambled Eg...
Our Birth Announceme...

Travelogue: Seattle in 48 hours (Round 3, with kids)

COMMENTS: 32

travelogue travel  Travelogue: Seattle in 48 hours (Round 3, with kids)
travelogue travel  Travelogue: Seattle in 48 hours (Round 3, with kids)

This was my third visit to Seattle, and on each visit my impression has been consistent: wow. I’m sure it hasn’t hurt that every visit has been free of the notorious drizzle, but even grey skies couldn’t obscure how beautiful this city is.

We were lucky to get to spend two nights in Seattle a little while back as part of Coast Hotel’s “Great Coast Road Trip.” Essentially, I was asked if I’d like to do a three-city leg of a multi-blogger road trip, write about for their website, and bring my family along. I’ve been invited for some press travel before, but rarely with Aron and the kids, so I usually decline. This was such a treat! You can of course read my posts about the trip on their site—and I’m under no obligation to say more—but we had such a great time (even as we were so daunted by the prospect of a road trip with an infant) that I still wanted to share a travelogue here, too.

Anyway, the plan was this: fly to Seattle and spend two nights there before picking up a Zipcar and driving part of the Cascades loop to Wenatchee, and then on to Portland, before passing along the car to someone else and flying home. We had never been to Portland or Wenatchee (and I’ll talk about those stops next week), and it had been 8 years since our last visit to Seattle… when we almost moved there! We were excited to go back.

travelogue travel  Travelogue: Seattle in 48 hours (Round 3, with kids)
travelogue travel  Travelogue: Seattle in 48 hours (Round 3, with kids)
travelogue travel  Travelogue: Seattle in 48 hours (Round 3, with kids)

The flight from Sacramento to Seattle passed so quickly! Aron and I started hatching plans for return trips before we even left the airport. For his part, Hudson would have been happy to never leave the airport tram.

On that note, public transportation into the city center is supposed to be simple and efficient, but we opted for a taxi as neither Hudson nor Skyler are carrying their own things yet—and they seem to require so much!

travelogue travel  Travelogue: Seattle in 48 hours (Round 3, with kids)
travelogue travel  Travelogue: Seattle in 48 hours (Round 3, with kids)
travelogue travel  Travelogue: Seattle in 48 hours (Round 3, with kids)

We arrived in Seattle right around nap time, so after checking in at the Roosevelt (our first Coast hotel), we took a little break before heading back out. We were downtown and, I noted, just off of the main shopping strip and blocks from the original Nordstrom. I briefly considered bidding the weary crew adieu for some afternoon shopping, but we had a fairly full itinerary.

READ MORE

Riding the rails
Hither & Thither...
Travelogue: St. Luci...
Skootcase
Massimo Vitali's Bra...

Headed south (& Friday links)

COMMENTS: 19

uncategorized travel  Headed south (& Friday links)

We’re flying south for a really quick getaway in Los Angeles. We’re staying on the cusp of Santa Monica and Venice which, while we lived in LA for five years ( a long time ago), isn’t as familiar a ‘hood to me. As much as I’d love to just visit all of our old haunts in West Hollywood and East LA, we may try to stick to the west side. Any tips?

In the meantime, I’m looking forward to sharing photos from our brief stay in Seattle, next week on the site, as well as the finished laundry room (we’re not talking miracles, but it is so much better than before).

Until then, some things of note… 

READ MORE

Guest Post: Will at ...
Quack, Quack
Recovery (and resche...
Hudson's 3rd Birthda...
Looking back at Cape...

Date Night: the Napa Wine Train

COMMENTS: 4

travel california  Date Night: the Napa Wine Train

travel california  Date Night: the Napa Wine Train

travel california  Date Night: the Napa Wine Train

We’ve been visiting Napa and Sonoma for years, but it wasn’t until last week that we finally spent an evening enjoying the Napa Valley Wine Train. We’ve seen it glide past (while we’ve sat at a red light, roshambo-ing for the role of designated driver) and have always been curious. So when they offered us a chance to come aboard for a date, I didn’t hesitate.

In case you aren’t familiar with it, the Napa Valley Wine Train is an antique train (think refurbished 1915-1917 Pullman Cars) that runs on 25-miles of track through the valley while you sip wine and eat a multi-course meal (prepared onboard). This summer, it celebrates its 25th anniversary!

Here are some scenes from the evening—which was gorgeous!

READ MORE

Any tips?
Travelogue: Montauk ...
Intrepid travelers
New travelogue: St. ...
The Gardener in Berk...

The Blue City of Jodhpur

COMMENTS: 19

uncategorized travel  The Blue City of Jodhpur
uncategorized travel  The Blue City of Jodhpur
uncategorized travel  The Blue City of Jodhpur

Have you seen JCrew‘s catalogue set in India? I recognized the setting immediately as Udaipur—our first stop in Rajasthan when we visited a few years ago.

The entire state of Rajasthan was such an explosion of color; it was incredible. I think my favorite city from our brief tour was, however, Jodhpur—or “the blue city.” I wrote extensively about our visit in Part two of our India Travelogue, but a highlight was ascending to Meherangarh Fort. Incredible in its own right (ramparts of the fort extend from a massive sandstone outcropping and are themselves made of finely carved sandstone), the Fort also afforded us beautiful views of the indigo-hued homes below (apparently painted so because indigo was thought to protect the buildings from insects and help with cooling, and caught on after the Brahmin caste used the color).

uncategorized travel  The Blue City of Jodhpur
uncategorized travel  The Blue City of Jodhpur
uncategorized travel  The Blue City of Jodhpur
uncategorized travel  The Blue City of Jodhpur
uncategorized travel  The Blue City of Jodhpur
uncategorized travel  The Blue City of Jodhpur

At sunset, the dwellings truly glowed and the cool air filled with birds and the sounds of prayer from the temples.

uncategorized travel  The Blue City of Jodhpur
uncategorized travel  The Blue City of Jodhpur
uncategorized travel  The Blue City of Jodhpur
uncategorized travel  The Blue City of Jodhpur

It was just one of the highlights from this vibrant and generous city.

P.S. The portion of India Travelogue featuring Jodhpur. The portion featuring that spot in the JCrew catalogue, Udaipur (along with Mumbai and Narlai). And one way to preserve a souvenir from the trip.

Guest Post: Eva of S...
Quack, Quack
Beautiful India
Date night
Holiday in Palm Spri...

Visiting DisneyWorld (with a toddler)

COMMENTS: 30

travel family  Visiting DisneyWorld (with a toddler)
travel family  Visiting DisneyWorld (with a toddler)
travel family  Visiting DisneyWorld (with a toddler)

Curious what it’s like to visit DisneyWorld with two under three? We just spent a week exploring the resort parks in Orlando over the course of a five-day-hopper pass with Skyler (3 months), Hudson (almost 3 years), and my parents; Aron joined us most days after wrapping up at a conference. Here are some photos from our family vacation—along with some notes and tips I gleaned during our stay.

READ MORE

Travelogue: Cape Cod...
Something special in...
Five years this Satu...
Wanderlust: Iceland'...
Teething remedies (a...